ROADSIDE SPRAY PROGRAM

Wild Parsnip, ClearView Herbicide, and Safety

Weeds and other noxious invasive vegetation grow on the roadsides, posing risk to you and others. Some of the risks include improper drainage, road surface erosion, blocking traffic signs and hazard markers, obstructing driver vision at intersections and blocking the line of sight around curves, also obstructing the view of oncoming wildlife crossing the road. Direct skin contact with noxious invasive weeds can cause serious burns, rashes, and vision loss. It is imperative to control roadside vegetation to preventing these hazards and the spread of noxious-invasive plant species onto adjacent properties.

Wild Parsnip

Wild Parsnip is a noxious-invasive plant increasingly common in Lanark County. The plant is found in areas such as road shoulders, roadside ditches, rail corridors, trails, and uncultivated lands.

Wild Parsnip poses a health risk to humans. The plant sap may cause skin and eye irritation and make the skin prone to severe burning and blistering when exposed to the sun. The blisters typically occur one to two days after contact with the plant. In some cases, this can result in long-term scarring of the skin. It also out-competes native plants including pollinator-friendly plants, reduces forage crop quality, and its chemicals inhibit weight gain and fertility in livestock.

The best way to avoid contact with Wild Parsnip is to become familiar with what the plant looks like and the proper handling techniques when dealing with the plant.

For important Safety Information on Wild Parsnip hazards, controls, and disposal, review the Wild Parsnip - Best Management Practices in Ontario.    

When a weed such as Wild Parsnip is declared a noxious weed, both the County and members of the public are able to purchase herbicides to control it. Use for control of noxious weeds is not considered a cosmetic use of pesticides because the plant can pose a risk to people. Further information is available on the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) website.

Residents can also contact the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit for more information relating to Public Health in regards to Wild Parsnip or the use of ClearView Herbicide at 613-267-4114 or visit their website at www.healthunit.org

 

Facts about ClearView Herbicide

ClearView herbicide is the new standard for roadside vegetation managers who are looking for effective control of annual and perennial broadleaf weeds, noxious, invasive plants and shrubs on rights-of-way, industrial and other non-crop areas in Canada

Product Features: • Registered in Canada for roadside, rights-of-way and other non-crop uses • Excellent broad-spectrum broadleaf weed and shrub control • Favourable environmental, human health and safety profile • Low use rates • Tank mix flexibility • Convenient water dispersible granule formulation • Formulation based on Dow AgroSciences Reduced Risk Aminopyralid Chemistry along with another herbicide group to provide wider spectrum control

Formulation, Rates, and Packaging: • ClearView requires the addition of a non-ionic surfactant at 0.2% v/v ( 2L per 1000L spray solution) • Formulated water dispersible granule with a use rate of 230 g/ha. • 1.84 kg container treats 8 ha. • A measuring device is provided to approximate weight when less than the full amount is required • One case of ClearView treats 16 ha.

Herbicide Group: Groups 4 & 2

Use: • Selective broadleaf weed control in rights-of-way, industrial and other non-crop areas, providing control of weed and shrub species for up to two years following application • ClearView can be applied alone, or in a tank-mix combination for a wider spectrum of control of weeds and shrubs

Weeds Controlled: ClearView controls the following weeds when applied at 230 g/ha: • Absinth wormwood • Ball mustard • Bluebur • Buckbrush (western snowberry) • Canada fleabane • Canada goldenrod* • Canada thistle • Chickweed • Clover (red, white) • Common groundsel • Common ragweed • Corn spurry • Cow cockle • Cudweed • Curly dock • Dandelion • Field scabious • Fireweed •Flixweed • Green smartweed • Hemp-nettle • Horse-nettle • Kochia*** • Lady’s-thumb • Lamb’s-quarters* • Musk thistle (nodding thistle) • Narrow-leaved hawk’s-beard *Suppression. **All varieties except ALS resistant canola *** Non ALS resistant biotypes • Ox-eye daisy (pre-bud) • Perennial pepperweed • Perennial sow-thistle • Plumeless thistle • Prickly lettuce • Prostrate pigweed • Pussytoes • Russian thistle*** • Scentless chamomile • Shepherd’s-purse • Spotted knapweed • Stinkweed • Stork’s-bill • Sweet clover • Tall buttercup • Tansy • Tartary buckwheat • Volunteer alfalfa • Volunteer canola** • Western ragweed • Wild buckwheat* • Wild mustard • Wild rose • Wild strawberry • Yarrow* • Yellow starthistle  • Narrow-leaved hawk’s-beard

Herbicidal Activity: Depending on the weed species, you can begin to see results within hours or days. Plant growth will stop within 24 – 48 hours after treatment. Most susceptible species will be controlled within 4 to 8 weeks following application.

Soil Behaviour: ClearView provides extended control of newly germinating seedling weeds following application. Dissipation occurs primarily through microbial degradation. Laboratory half-life is 10-178 days for ClearView.

Grass Safety: Most grass species are tolerant to ClearView applications at the registered rate. Do not apply on areas where legume damage cannot be tolerated.

Grazing Restrictions: There are no grazing restrictions for livestock or lactating dairy animals that have grazed on treated areas. ClearView works like a natural growthregulating hormone found only in plants and not found in livestock and wildlife. Cattle and wildlife do not metabolize ClearView. When ingested, ClearView is rapidly excreted from the body in the urine, and does not accumulate in the animal.

User and Environmental Safety: ClearView has low impact on the environment compared to currently registered products. This was confirmed through favorable data and risk assessments presented for toxicological, eco-toxicological and environmental fate. 

Summary: ClearView provides a unique combination of desirable environmental and agronomic features: • Safe to the environment and users, when used according to the label • Lower worker exposure due to its favorable toxicity profile and low use rates. • Extended shrub and weed control • Alternative to Tordon™ 101 herbicide for weed control • Can be tank mixed with 2,4-D Amine or Vantage Plus MAX II to broaden the spectrum of control and to fit any program • Convenient water dispersible granule that is easy to mix and stays in suspension

Roadside Spraying: Spraying occurs from the edge of the gravel shoulder to the property limits and uses ClearView herbicide to control the growth of undesirable vegetation. The contractors performing the work are fully licensed. Spraying occurs in areas identified during weed audits.

The following locations will not be sprayed:

  • Roadside ditches maintained by property owners
  • 10 metre buffer from freshwater habitat (boom spraying)
  • Sprayers are turned off at mailboxes or whenever a pedestrian is nearby

All requests for no spraying should be submitted to the Township of Montague Works Department on or before May 24, 2018. ‘No Spray Requests’ are not guaranteed until the review process is completed and approval granted by the Chief Building Official.

*If Refusing Municipal ClearView Roadside Spraying, you can fill out the form attached, and take the following recommendations into consideration:

Digging

  • A shovel recommended for removing small infestations of Wild Parsnip
  • The best time for removing the plant is after rain when the ground is soft or during a drought when the taproot shrinks
  • This can be effective if done only before the plant has gone to seed
  • This technique is easiest in moist soil and during the spring when the taproot is a manageable size
  • After removal, Wild Parsnip plants may be spread out on the ground to dry Place the plants in a black garbage bag and dispose of the bags with household garbage. Do not compost if the plant has already gone to seed. If the removed plant has seeds, place the plant in a black garbage bag and let it sit in the sun for at least a week
    • Dispose of the bags with household garbage
  • After the Wild Parsnip infestation is controlled, rehabilitate the site by planting native species that will out-compete the Wild Parsnip seedlings and prevent re-infestation.

 

  • CAUTION: When controlling Wild Parsnip, ALWAYS wear protective clothing, including waterproof gloves, long sleeve shirts, long pants, rubber boots, and eye protection. Ideally, wear disposable “spray suit” coveralls over normal clothing (spray suits are commercial grade waterproof coveralls). Tape coveralls at the wrist to minimize potential skin exposure to the sap. Remove protective clothing carefully to minimize sap exposure and wash clothing thoroughly. More information about the health effects of Wild Parsnip is available at http://www.healthunit.org/hazards/dangerousweeds.html.

Mowing

  • Recommended for controlling larger infestations
  • The best mowing time depends on flowering and seed production
  • Do not mow if the plant has gone to seed (normally seed production will start in mid-July)
  • To prevent further seed dispersal, mow in June when the umbel starts to flower
  • If mowing is completed when the umbel starts to flower, one or two mows may be effective. However, weekly mowing will also suppress the infestation
  • Be aware that mowing can also allow sunlight to reach the Wild Parsnip rosettes that are lower than the mower blades, prompting rapid growth and cut plants will likely re-sprout after mowing, so it may be necessary to repeat mowing and/or combine mowing with other control methods, such as tarping
  • Mowing should be repeated for several seasons to be effective
  • After the Wild Parsnip infestation is controlled, rehabilitate the site by planting native species that will out-compete the seedlings and prevent re-infestation.

 

  • CAUTION: Care must be taken when mowing to prevent the transfer of sap onto equipment and people. Poorly timed mowing can increase Wild Parsnip populations by dispersing seeds. Wear protective clothing, including waterproof gloves, long sleeve shirts and pants, rubber boots, and eye protection. Ideally, wear disposable “spray suit” coveralls over normal clothing (spray suits are commercial grade waterproof coveralls). Tape coveralls at the wrist to minimize potential skin exposure to the sap. Remove protective clothing carefully to minimize sap exposure and wash clothing thoroughly.

Tarping

  • Recommended to be used following large infestation control measures to smother new growth
  • Tarping is optional but may reduce the frequency of mowing required in the next growing season
  • Materials for tarping will not be provided. As a result, using tarping as a control method is up to the discretion and expense of the person responsible for the Wild Parsnip control.
  • DIRECTIONS
    • Cover the infested area with a dark coloured tarp or heavy material
    • Weed barriers used by landscapers or blue poly tarps are good options
    • Take care to weigh down the tarp material so it doesn’t blow away, but be sure it is still receiving adequate sun exposure.
    • Tent pegs work well as long as the ground isn’t too rocky
    • Leave the plastic in place for at least one full growing season to ensure the roots are smothered.
    • This method is effective in preventing sunlight from reaching the plants and heating up the soil to kill the roots.
    • After the tarping is complete, rehabilitate the site by planting native species that will outcompete the Wild Parsnip seedlings and prevent re-infestation.

 

  • CAUTION: If there is a potential to be exposed to the toxic sap wear protective clothing, including waterproof gloves, long sleeve shirts and pants, rubber boots, and eye protection. Ideally, wear disposable “spray suit” coveralls over normal clothing (spray suits are commercial grade waterproof coveralls). Tape coveralls at the wrist to minimize potential skin exposure to the sap. Remove protective clothing carefully to minimize sap exposure and wash clothing thoroughly. More information about the health effects of Wild Parsnip is available at http://www.healthunit.org/hazards/dangerousweeds.html

Current consolidated law

  • A consolidated statute or regulation refers to a version that incorporates all amendments or other changes into the original text.
  • Under current consolidated law, you can find the most recent versions of all consolidated public statutes and regulations.
  • The currency of a consolidated law is indicated in its consolidation period. The consolidation period is the period during which the consolidation accurately represents the law, as of the date on which the law is accessed on e-Laws.
  • Current consolidated laws are usually current to the e-Laws currency date. Today, May 8, 2018 the e-Laws currency date is April 27, 2018.
  • You may come across a consolidation period in which the “from” date is later than the “to” date. In that case, the consolidation is actually current to the “from” date.
  • Private statutes and some older public statutes and regulations are not available in consolidated form.
  • Note that any provision of a statute or regulation that a court has ruled is of no effect continues to appear in the consolidated law. While a court’s decision may affect the interpretation, operation or application of a law, it does not actually amend or change the wording of the law. If a law is subsequently amended by the lawmaker to reflect a court’s decision, those amendments would then be published and consolidated on e-Laws.

Weed Control Act (R.S.O. 1990, Chapter W.5)

  • Duty to destroy noxious weeds
    • 3 Every person in possession of land shall destroy all noxious weeds on it.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 3.
  • Persons deemed in possession
    • 4 For the purposes of this Act, the owner of land shall be deemed, unless the contrary is proved, to be the person in possession of it.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 4.
  • Road authorities deemed in possession of roads
    • 5 For the purposes of section 3, every road authority within the meaning of the Public Transportation and Highway Improvement Act shall be deemed to be the person in possession of the land under its jurisdiction.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 5.
  • Appointment of inspectors
    • 6 (1)  The council of every upper-tier and single-tier municipality shall by by-law appoint one or more persons as area weed inspectors to enforce this Act in the area within the council’s jurisdiction and fix their remuneration or other compensation.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 6 (1); 2002, c. 17, Sched. F, Table.
  • Application for warrant
    • (3)  If an inspector is denied entry or access to buildings or land or is obstructed while carrying out an inspection, the inspector may apply to a justice of the peace for a warrant.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 12 (3).
  • Issuing of warrant
    • (4)  If a justice of the peace is satisfied on evidence upon oath that it is necessary for an inspector to enter any buildings or land for the purpose of this Act, the justice of the peace may issue a warrant authorizing an inspector to enter the buildings or land specified in the warrant, together with such police officers as the inspector calls upon to assist him or her.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 12 (4).
  • Application without notice
    • (5)  A justice of the peace may receive and consider an application for a warrant without notice to the owner or occupier of the buildings or land.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 12 (5).
  • Order for destruction of weeds
    • 13 (1)  An inspector who finds noxious weeds or weed seeds on land in the area within his or her jurisdiction may order the person in possession of the land to destroy the noxious weeds or weed seeds.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 13 (1).
  • Time for destruction of weeds
    • (2)  The order shall be in the prescribed form and shall specify a time of at least seven days, excluding Saturdays and holidays, from the date of the service of the order within which the noxious weeds or weed seeds shall be destroyed.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 13 (2).
  • Obstruction of inspectors
    • 14 No person shall hinder or obstruct an inspector in the course of his or her duties, refuse to furnish the inspector with information or furnish him or her with false information.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 14.
  • Failure to comply with order
    • 15 (1)  If an order served under section 13 is not complied with, the inspector may cause the noxious weeds or weed seeds to be destroyed in the prescribed manner.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 15 (1).
  • Destruction of weeds
    • 16 (1)  Despite section 13, the council of any local municipality may direct any of its municipal weed inspectors or, if there are none, the area weed inspectors to cause noxious weeds or weed seeds to be destroyed in the prescribed manner on all or part of any lot shown on a registered plan of subdivision and on lots not exceeding 10 acres that are not shown on such a plan.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 16 (1); 2002, c. 17, Sched. F, Table.
  • Notice requirement
    • (2)  Before noxious weeds or weed seeds are destroyed, the council shall publish notice of its intent to have the noxious weeds or weed seeds destroyed in a newspaper having general circulation in the municipality.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 16 (2).
  • Statement of expenses to be served on owner and person in possession of land
    • (4)  The clerk of the municipality shall have a statement of the expenses and a notice requesting payment served on the person in possession of the land and on its owner.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 16 (4).
  • Failure to pay
    • (6)  If the person upon whom a statement and notice were served fails to pay the amount set out in the statement within fifteen days after the service of the notice, the clerk shall present the statement to the council of the municipality in which the land is located, and the council shall order the amount to be paid out of the general funds of the municipality.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 16 (6).
  • Application for refund, etc.
    • 17 A person may apply to the council for the cancellation, reduction or refund of an amount levied in the year with respect to orders for weed control and is entitled to make an appeal to the Assessment Review Board in the same manner as for taxes under section 357 of the Municipal Act, 2001 or section 323 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006, as the case may be.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 17; 2002, c. 17, Sched. F, Table; 2006, c. 32, Sched. C, s. 70 (3).
  • Notice requiring noxious weeds and weed seeds to be destroyed
    • 18 (1)  A district weed inspector who finds noxious weeds or weed seeds on any land owned by or under the control of a municipality within his or her district may deliver or send by mail, by registered mail, by certified mail or by courier service to the clerk of the municipality a notice requiring the noxious weeds or weed seeds to be destroyed before a date specified in the notice.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 18 (1); 2009, c. 33, Sched. 1, s. 27 (3).
  • Failure to comply with notice
    • (2)  If the notice is not complied with, the district weed inspector may cause the noxious weeds or weed seeds to be destroyed in the prescribed manner.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 18 (2).
  • Recovery of expenses
    • (3)  The expenses incurred by the district weed inspector under subsection (2) shall be paid by the municipality concerned and are recoverable in any court of competent jurisdiction by the Minister in the name of Her Majesty as a debt owed to the Crown.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 18 (3).
  • Prohibition
    • 19. No person shall deposit or permit to be deposited any noxious weeds or weed seeds in any place where they might grow or spread.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 19.
  • Agricultural machines
    • 20 If the moving of a machine used for agricultural purposes is likely to cause noxious weeds or weed seeds to grow or spread, no person shall move the machine or cause it to be moved without first removing from it all seeds and other residue.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 20.
  • Grain elevators, etc.
    • 21 A person in charge of a grain elevator, seed-cleaning plant or other grain-cleaning or grain-grinding plant shall dispose of all refuse containing weed seeds in a manner that will prevent them from growing or spreading.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 21.
  • Exception
    • 22 Sections 3, 13, 16 and 18 do not apply to noxious weeds or weed seeds that are far enough away from any land used for agricultural or horticultural purposes that they do not interfere with that use.  R.S.O. 1990, c. W.5, s. 22.